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You are so brave and quiet I forget you are suffering. — Ernest HemingwayA Farewell to Arms (via wordsnquotes)

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The world is indeed full of peril, and in it there are many dark places; but still there is much that is fair, and though in all lands love is now mingled with grief, it grows perhaps the greater. — J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers (via wordsnquotes)

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Great books help you understand, and they help you feel understood. — John Green (via wordsnquotes)

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How odd, I can have all this inside me
and to you it’s just words. — David Foster Wallace , The Pale King (via thegirlwiththelittlecurl)

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Your mind has a way of not letting you forget things you wish you could. Especially with people. Like, you’ll always try your best to forget things that people say to you or about you, but you always remember. And you’ll try to forget things you’ve seen that no one should see, but you just can’t do it. And when you try to forget someone’s face, you can’t get it out of your head. — John Corey Whaley, Where Things Come Back (via wordsnquotes)

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Most people think happiness is about gaining something, but it’s not. It’s all about getting rid of the darkness you accumulate. — Carolyn Crane (via wordsnquotes)

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Find meaning. Distinguish melancholy from sadness. Go out for a walk. It doesn’t have to be a romantic walk in the park, spring at its most spectacular moment, flowers and smells and outstanding poetical imagery smoothly transferring you into another world. It doesn’t have to be a walk during which you’ll have multiple life epiphanies and discover meanings no other brain ever managed to encounter. Do not be afraid of spending quality time by yourself. Find meaning or don’t find meaning but ‘steal’ some time and give it freely and exclusively to your own self. Opt for privacy and solitude. That doesn’t make you antisocial or cause you to reject the rest of the world. But you need to breathe. And you need to be. — Albert Camus (via skeletales)

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It’s nice to be important, but it’s also important to be nice. Never forget that. —

Sacha Baron Cohen

Happy Birthday!

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BOOK OF THE DAY:
Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
Christopher Johnson McCandless is a young man from a wealthy family who chose to explore the Alaskan wilderness on April 1992. His goal was to make a new life, one where everything he had was to become obsolete. He abandons his possessions and human relationships. Four months later, he is found dead by a moose hunter. Jon Krakauer composes Into the Wild, where he obsessively researches and retraces McCandless’ steps and drive for exploration. 
McCandless was known for his adventurous streak. After graduating from college in 1991, he took a journey through the West and Southwest of the United States. He abandoned his car, removed its license plates, as well as burned his cash in the Mojave Desert. McCandless renamed himself Alexander Supertramp and revamped his identity. He was a free man in every sense. He had no attachments, no possessions and was free to roam and experience nature as he desired in the most raw and primitive sense. He disposes all bonds and materials representing civilization, including a map. He has vanished into the wild leaving no trace behind, not even his family knows his whereabouts. Like McCandless mentions in the book: he does not know what time is, nor what day or where he is. None of it matters.
The biggest issue concerning Into the Wild is not Krakauer’s writing, but his protagonist, Christopher McCandless. Krakauer holds McCandless as a courageous young man, rebelling from society in the purest and sincerest form. He has abolished his wealth and all ties for the purpose of wanderlust and an unorthodox method of self-discovery. With McCandless’ family’s support, Krakauer reveals intimate details plaguing the young man’s life and motives for leaving. He writes in an engaging vocabulary and provides enough conversational dialogue to keep you compelled in wanting to know more. Krakauer’s drive for answers is the most commendable quality of Into the Wild. It is clear that much thought and research when into depicting McCandless’ final days. 
McCandless was selfish, naive, idealistic, impulsive, immature, rash, destructive and courageous. Krakauer does an excellent job presenting McCandless’ story with empathy.  He successfully tells the story of a real person and fills in the missing pieces and distressing facts. The harsh truth is, probably, the obscurity of the death of McCandless, as well as his family’s grief are the prime reasons to make you feel empathetic. It is instinctual to judge McCandless for his carelessness, but Krakauer never does that. He is tactful and intelligent. Krakauer is able to masterfully tell a vague story due to his understanding of the central character. He was once idealistic and young too; he also embarked on dangerous adventures. We must keep in mind that for McCandless, ”the trip was to be an odyssey in the fullest sense of the word, an epic journey that would change everything.” 
Whether Chris McCandless is daring and courageous or privileged and naive is for you to decide. He very well might be all these things. One thing is certain, Into the Wild is an unforgettable read. You will find yourself thinking and becoming angry and sympathetic simultaneously. 
Read excerpts from the book here! Get the book here! 
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He read a lot. He used a lot of big words. I think maybe part of what got him into trouble was that he did too much thinking. Sometimes he tried too hard to make sense of the world, to figure out why people were bad to each other so often. A couple of times I tried to tell him it was a mistake to get too deep into that kind of stuff, but [he] got stuck on things. He always had to know the absolute right answer before he could go on to the next thing. — Jon KrakauerInto the Wild (via wordsnquotes)

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All that is gold does not glitter,
Not all those who wander are lost;
The old that is strong does not wither,
Deep roots are not reached by the frost. —  J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring (via wordsnquotes)

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